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RSDN FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)



Category: Main -> Dances


Question
·  Do I need a partner to come to a dance?
·  What if I don’t know how to dance - can I learn at the dance?
·  My friends don’t dance – can I bring them to a dance?
·  How can I ask someone I don’t know to dance?
·  How can I make newer dancers feel welcome?
·  Will I find people my age at the dance?
·  What kind of bands play for dances?
·  What do people wear to dances?
·  What kind of shoes should I wear?
·  What’s wrong with street shoes?
·  What should I do about my purse at a dance?
·  Why do you ask that people use fragrance-free personal products?
·  What’s the most important thing to remember about dancing?

Answer
·  Do I need a partner to come to a dance?

Many people who come to dances come without a partner. They look forward to dancing with as many people as they can during the course of the evening, and meeting and dancing with newcomers..

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·  What if I don’t know how to dance - can I learn at the dance?

Dances may offer a “survival” introductory lesson before the dance, included in the dance admission, so you’ll be dancing that same night. Remember that everyone in the room was a beginning dancer once - just tell your partners that you are a new dancer.

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·  My friends don’t dance – can I bring them to a dance?

Yes, come early with them - they can take the pre-dance lesson so they will be all set to enjoy the evening.

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·  How can I ask someone I don’t know to dance?

Dancers are generally a very friendly group of people. Leaders ask followers, and followers ask leaders to dance. Just make eye contact, smile, and say “Would you like to dance?” - then introduce yourselves during the course of the dance.

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·  How can I make newer dancers feel welcome?

Look around for people wanting to get out on the dance floor. Then after your dance with them, see if you can introduce them to another partner for their next dance.

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·  Will I find people my age at the dance?

All ages attend dances – there will be dancers from 17 to 70+, all enjoying themselves.

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·  What kind of bands play for dances?

We dance to swing bands that play for dances throughout the region. The musicians really like to play for dancers and enjoy the interaction between the dancers and the band. We let them know how much we appreciate this by applauding after each tune.

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·  What do people wear to dances?

Wear comfortable, casual clothing that lets you move freely; you will get too warm in a jacket or sweater. Some people like to dress up.

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·  What kind of shoes should I wear?

Wear comfortable clean, non-marking shoes that stay on your foot and have a relatively smooth sole.

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·  What’s wrong with street shoes?

Dancing in street shoes or heels can scratch & mark the wood dance floor or make it wet, sticky or dusty.

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·  What should I do about my purse at a dance?

It’s not a good idea to leave a purse either in your car or lying around the dance floor. Consider a pocket or waist pack.

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·  Why do you ask that people use fragrance-free personal products?

Many people are sensitive or allergic to fragrances - perfumes, colognes, after-shaves - so we ask that you do not use these when you come out dancing.

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·  What’s the most important thing to remember about dancing?

Dances and classes are informal & fun, and dancing is really about enjoying the music with your partner… We like what Dave Barry said in Sixteen Things That it Took Me 50 Years to Learn – “Nobody cares if you can't dance well. Just get up and dance!”

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